Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store

A must-have for every Musician:

This guitar tuner is very fast, accurate and recognizes all strings using the built-in mic! Easy and perfect fine-tuning for electric and acoustic guitar, bass, cello, ukulele, etc.

This app is developed by a guitarist and electrical engineer, thus it combines high usability and cutting-edge signal processing.

Simple Guitar Tuner is easy to use and provides an aesthetic and custumizable user interface.

Features:

  • High precision (approximately 0.1 %).
  • Large frequency range (22 Hz to 1000 Hz).
  • Suitable for all kinds of string instruments.
  • Display of exact frequency (in Hz).
  • Display of frequency deviation (in Hz, marked by up/down arrow).
  • Gauge view of the detected tone (semitone) and octave.
  • Spectral view (FFT - visualization of overtones).
  • Time-domain view (autocorrelation).
  • Tuning by ear - two selectable waveforms.
  • Configurable user interface (8 different themes).
  • Detailed user manual.
  • Free user support.
  • Developed for the iPhone and iPad (iOS 8.0 and above).

Simple Guitar Tuner in motion

This easy-to-use guitar tuner is developed both for the iPhone and iPad (iOS 8.0 and above), and has the following features:

Wide Frequency Range

With Simple Guitar Tuner, you can tune the following instruments:

  • Bass (30.87 Hz to 98 Hz).
  • Cello (65.41 Hz to 220 Hz).
  • Contrabass ( 82.41 Hz to 196 Hz).
  • Guitar (82.41 Hz to 329.6 Hz).
  • Viola (130.8 Hz to 440 Hz)
  • Mandolin (196 Hz to 659.3 Hz)
  • Violin (196 Hz to 659.3 Hz).
  • Ukulele (146.8 Hz to 440Hz, depending on tuning).
  • Piano (partially: 27.5 Hz to 987.8 Hz, frequencies above can't be detected with enough precision).

Frequencies Overview

(Tones and Semitones)

  • Octave
  • C
  • C#
  • D
  • Eb
  • E
  • F
  • F#
  • G
  • G#
  • A
  • Bb
  • B
  • 0
  • 16.35
  • 17.32
  • 18.35
  • 19.45
  • 20.60
  • 21.83
  • 23.12
  • 24.50
  • 25.96
  • 27.50
  • 29.14
  • 30.87
  • 1
  • 32.70
  • 34.65
  • 36.71
  • 38.89
  • 41.20
  • 43.65
  • 46.25
  • 49.00
  • 51.91
  • 55.00
  • 58.27
  • 61.74
  • 2
  • 65.41
  • 69.30
  • 73.42
  • 77.78
  • 82.41
  • 87.31
  • 92.50
  • 98.00
  • 103.8
  • 110.0
  • 116.5
  • 123.5
  • 3
  • 130.8
  • 138.6
  • 146.8
  • 155.6
  • 164.8
  • 174.6
  • 185.0
  • 196.0
  • 207.7
  • 220.0
  • 233.1
  • 246.9
  • 4
  • 261.6
  • 277.2
  • 293.7
  • 311.1
  • 329.6
  • 349.2
  • 370.0
  • 392.0
  • 415.3
  • 440.0
  • 466.2
  • 493.9
  • 5
  • 523.3
  • 554.4
  • 587.3
  • 622.3
  • 659.3
  • 698.5
  • 740.0
  • 784.0
  • 830.6
  • 880.0
  • 932.3
  • 987.8
16.35

Frequency not covered by Simple Guitar Tuner

16.35

Frequency Covered

16.35

Guitar

16.35

Bass

  • Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store
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    Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store

Simple Guitar Tuner is Really Intuitive

Here some screenshots of the app:

  • - Tone generator -
  • - Real time autocorrelation -
  • - Highlighting of turned strings -
Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store
  • - Fine Tuning -
  • - Real time spectrak view (FFT) -
  • - Display of (semi) tones -
Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store
  • - Configuration of -
  • - Reference tone -
  • - Background color (Theme) -
Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store

- Detailed User Manual -

Simple Guitar Tuner on the App Store

Pitch Detection

As often misunderstood, pitch and frequency are not the same thing: while frequency is a pure physical quantity, pitch has to do with perception or psychology.

Let's take an example: the low E string of a guitar has a frequency of 82.4 Hz. If you produce a pure sine wave with the same frequency (for example with Audacity), the result will sound artificial and sterile. How do we get the typical sound of an instrument - as for example of a guitar? The keyword is "overtone": every string instrument (guitar, ukulele, mandolin, etc.) produces two different kind of tones: the keynote (thus the tone with the fundamental frequency) and multiple overtones. In addition, it often occurs that overtones are stronger (thus they have a higher amplitude) than the keynote. That's also a reason why frequency detection can be so difficult.

Please take into account that we talk about keynote (or fundamental frequency) when it deals with tuning an instrument (as for example with this IOS app)!